Wednesday, October 23, 2019
On Thursday, Rubio and Nelson unveiled the “South Florida Clean Coastal Waters Act" which orders the Interagency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) to study the causes of toxic algae in Lake Okeechobee and how it is impacting the Sunshine State.
Lee County in Southwest Florida will be getting the bulk of the funds, around $2 million, with $750,000 headed to Manatee County, $190,000 to Collier County and almost $100,000 to Sarasota County.
At an event in Orlando, Bill Herrle, the NFIB’s executive director in Florida, pointed to Patronis’ experience in the private sector as a reason his group was backing him for a full term.
Only time will tell whether his negotiations are successful.
Scott’s office sent out a released on Tuesday afternoon about the new request to the SBA for a Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration. 
The Sunshine State also placed first in two other categories.
Rubio and Nelson are calling for amending the 2019 Labor, Health, and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies appropriations bill to send $1 million to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help Floridians impacted by the algae blooms.
What TECO would have paid in corporate income taxes will instead be used to reduce rates, offsetting an expected increase resulting from previously incurred storm restoration costs.
Scott has been active on the issue in recent weeks including issuing an emergency order on the toxic algae last month. Last week, the governor issued an emergency order on red tide which is also impacting the Sunshine State. 
For Florida, offshore development in the federal waters could create more than 56,000 jobs by 2035 and could result in more than $2.6 billion annually in state revenues.