Sunday, July 5, 2020
U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist, D-Fla., introduced the “Prevent Harmful Algal Blooms Act” which U.S. Rep. Bill Posey, R-Fla., is cosponsoring. 
This announcement comes in advance of the 145th anniversary of Mary McLeod Bethune’s birthday, celebrated on July 10.
Demings is co-sponsoring the bill and she explained some of the reasons behind her support of it this week.
On Wednesday, the House passed U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio’s, D-Oreg., “Moving Forward Act” on a 233-188 vote. While three Republicans voted to support the measure and two Democrats voted against it, party lines held in the Florida delegation with the exception of U.S. Rep. Francis Rooney, R-Fla., who did not vote. Rooney, who is not running for reelection in November, has missed several votes this year as he continues to recover from COVID-19.
“The DCF Accountability Act will permanently change the landscape of Florida’s child welfare system, addressing longstanding issues affecting Florida’s families, while keeping them safe and ultimately allowing them to thrive,” said DeSantis after signing the bill. “I am extremely grateful to Secretary Poppell and to our legislative leaders for their advocacy and dedication to seeing this important legislation through to fruition.”
The funds are coming from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Gulf Coast Restoration for the Snorkel and Dive Reef construction project. The $1,233,566.00 Direct Component grant comes from funds included in the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act (RESTORE Act) which was passed in 2012.
All signers of Rubio's letter are members of the U.S. Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs that funds USAGM.
Rubio spoke at the virtual summit held by Christians United for Israel (CUFI).
The bill eliminates barriers of entry to certain professions licensed by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DPBR) by adding endorsement and reciprocity provisions, removing supplemental business licenses and corresponding license fees, reducing licensure education requirements, and eliminating other licensure and registration requirements.
In recent weeks, several Florida cities have supported taking down Confederate monuments even as a new poll shows a majority of Americans are not favor in removing them.