Thursday, July 2, 2020
College football is the greatest sport on Earth. It’s the only sport where every regular-season game actually matters. People complain about how there are too many bowl games and that most of them are meaningless exhibitions.
We are going to learn a lot about the state of football in the state of Florida this week.
If you are a college football blue blood, you better watch your back because the other schools are coming for you. 
The Florida Retail Federation (FRF) noted on Tuesday that the average Florida family will spend $81.30 per person to watch the big game on Sunday, up slightly from last year.
Last week, U.S. Rep. Donna Shalala, D-Fla., and U.S. Rep. Ross Spano, R-Fla., teamed up on the “Congressional Advisory Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics (CACIA) Act" which would create a “Blue-ribbon Congressional Commission to identify and examine issues of national concern related to the conduct of intercollegiate athletics and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).”
This week reaffirmed what’s been happening all season. There are simply good programs, mediocre programs and not so good programs regardless of which conference your team plays in.
Last week, I wrote that we would learn a lot about the state of football in the state of Florida this past weekend and, boy, did we ever. 
Millions of dollars in public funds have been used in Florida for sports stadiums since 1994, including almost $50 million each for TIAA Bank Field in Jacksonville, Amalie Arena in Tampa and Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg and more than $51 million for Hard Rock Stadium in South Florida--and there could be more coming.
Gamblers know all about the Super Bowl but it seems more Americans than ever are betting on the big game and President Donald Trump is one of the reasons. 
“According to the International Labor Organization, forced labor and human trafficking is a $150 billion industry globally with an estimated 40.3 million victims worldwide. With Florida hosting multiple high-profile events in the coming months, human traffickers may try to take advantage of the festivities to profit off the pain of others,” Moody’s office noted.