Monday, January 25, 2021
On Sunday, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., sent a letter to McKinsey & Company’s Global Managing Partner Kevin Sneader after the company’s Moscow office told its employees they could not participate in peaceful protests supporting Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.
Rubio first introduced this proposal four years ago and has been pushing it with the support of members of the Florida delegation from both sides of the aisle.
“It is an honor to have many of my fellow Senators, as well as leaders in our communities and state, serve in these important capacities,” said Simpson on Friday. “I have full confidence that they will diligently and effectively represent the Florida Senate and the state of Florida.”
At the end of last week, U.S. Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., sent a letter to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) following reports that President Joe Biden is working with U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-NY, to give New York City and the state of New York $2 billion in additional FEMA emergency funding.
Demings, now starting her third term on Capitol Hill, announced last week that she will stay on the committees she served on in her last term. 
During a U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee nominations hearing this week, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., questioned Antony Blinken, President Joseph Biden’s nominee to serve as the next U.S. Secretary of State.
U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., introduced the amendment at the start of the month with U.S. Reps. John Katko, R-NY, Jim McGovern, D-Mass., and Jamie Raskin, D-Mary., as the main backers. U.S. Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., is also behind it.
Florida’s two Republicans in the U.S. Senate--Marco Rubio and Rick Scott--joined the overwhelming majority of their colleagues in confirming President Joe Biden’s choice of Avril Haines to serve as Director of National Intelligence (DNI)
On Wednesday, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., spoke on the Senate floor to discuss the inauguration of President Joe Biden and the future of America.
Many of the articles that have appeared in the last few days comparing the two elections make a common point: that Rutherford B. Hayes and the Republican Party made a deal with Democrats that compromised African American civil rights in the South in exchange for the presidency. This is often used to argue against the creation of an Electoral Commission today since it resulted in such a “corrupt bargain” in 1876.