Tuesday, July 7, 2020
Lawson, who sits on the U.S. House Agriculture Committee and helped steer funds from the $867 billion Farm Bill to send $14 million to 1890-land grant universities including FAMU, weighed in on the scholarships on Monday. 
“The UNF community has come together in unprecedented ways to assist our students during this challenging time,” said UNF President David Szymanski on Tuesday. “Executive leadership, faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends all uniting is what makes UNF such a unique and special place.”
This week, U.S. Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell, D-Fla., introduced the “Bringing Additional Nurses to the Fight Act” which, she claims, will “expedite the process for foreign-trained physicians to become nurses and address the healthcare worker shortage in the U.S., which has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 crisis.”
Lawson pointed to $29,443,491 headed to the region which were part of $1.4 billion for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and colleges and universities serving low-income students. The funds were part of the $2.2 trillion stimulus package approved by Congress and the White House at the end of March to help the nation during the coronavirus pandemic.
At the end of last week, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., threw his support behind U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley’s, R-Mo., proposal to stop universities with endowments larger than $10 billion from getting federal stimulus funds during the coronavirus pandemic “unless they first spend some of their own money on coronavirus-related financial assistance for students with the greatest need.”
During this period, essential personnel are expected to continue to report to campus, unless otherwise authorized by their supervisor and vice president. Employees who are unsure about their status as essential personnel must seek guidance from their supervisor.
Over the next two years, the funds will “help develop response and adaptation strategies to combat red tide" and “will study the economic impacts of the 2017-2019 Florida red tide outbreak on tourism, commercial fishing, and public health, among others” looking at 80 different economic sectors.
The reaction by the Flagler Schools family (and I include our administrators, teachers, staff, students, parents, and school board members in this group), has been remarkable in the face of this novel coronavirus. We were able to switch from a brick-and-mortar model to a virtual learning model almost overnight.
On Monday, Lawson wrote eight student housing companies doing business in Tallahassee on the matter.
“Our first responders and health care professionals are on the front lines fighting COVID-19,” said Florida Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran on Monday. “These individuals are critical to providing medical care to those affected by the virus, and finding child care for their own children while performing these life-saving jobs allows them to continue serving the public. The Department of Education is committed to doing everything it can to help first responders and health care professionals find quality child care services while school campuses are closed.”